Northern Territory

Summary

Home to two world National Heritage-listed parks; Kakadu and Uluru.

Popular Walks

World Heritage Areas

  • Kakadu National Park
  • Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park

Contact details

Northern Territory Parks and Reserves:
https://nt.gov.au/leisure/parks-reserves

Northern Territory Tourism:
https://northernterritory.com/things-to-do/nature-and-wildlife/national-parks

Easy
2.1 km return
1 hr

Cemetery & Trig Hill Loop

This is a hugely historic area and this walk, with its interpretive signs, takes you out to the cemetery and around the immediate area, up Trig Hill and back to the Telegraph Station.

Easy
1.6 km return
1 hr

Claypan Walk (Rainbow Valley Conservation Reserve)

The Claypan Walk is 1.6 km return and meanders along the edge of the mostly dry claypans that transform into reflective pools for short periods after rain. There are several viewing platforms
along the way that provide the best views of Rainbow Valley.

Easy
1 km return
30 mins

Corroboree Rock Walk (East Macdonell Ranges)

Corroboree Rock is a dark grey column of dolomite an hour's drive east of Alice Springs.
It’s one of many sites in the MacDonnell Ranges that’s of great importance to the Eastern Arrernte people.

Take a short walk around the base of the rock to survey the area and have a closer look at the ancient sedimentary, fine-grained rock. At the base you can see dark grey and light grey streaky blobs of dolostone rock. A ring of low ground surrounding it makes it look like an obelisk.

The real significance of the rocky outcrop to the Eastern Arrernte people is not well known. Corroboree Rock was probably not a corroboree site due to the lack of water in the area, but was probably used as an important storage site for ceremonial objects.

The rock itself is an outcrop of dolomite from the Bitter Springs Formation originally laid down in salty lakes 800 million years ago.

Corroboree Rock Conservation Reserve is an easy stopover on your way to other East MacDonnell landmarks such as Trephina Gorge and Arltunga. The reserve is easily reached along the sealed road by two-wheel drive vehicles.

Easy
500 m return
15 mins

Karlu Karlu Walk

Karlu Karlu translates as 'round boulders', or the Devils Marbles, is a living cultural landscape and traditional country of the Warumunga, Kaytetye, Alyawarra and Warlpiri people. These granite boulders, many of which are precariously balanced on top of one another are scattered across the wide shallow valley that makes up the Reserve.

Easy
1.6 km return
45 mins

Mayijangu & Lookout Walk

Nyanjiki Lookout providing panoramic views of the Reserve and the opportunity to 'rock hop' the marbles. These granite boulders, many of which are precariously balanced on top of one another are scattered across the wide shallow valley that makes up the Reserve.

Easy
1 km return
40 mins

Mushroom Rock (Rainbow Valley Conservation Reserve)

A 1 km loop walk allows visitors to view Mushroom Rock, an interesting sandstone formation with many Fairy Martin (Petrochelidon ariel) nests attached to the upper walls.

Easy
5.2 km return
90 mins

Nurrku Walk & Yakkula Loop

This walk provides visitors with a longer opportunity to experience the wider Reserve. These granite boulders, many of which are precariously balanced on top of one another are scattered across the wide shallow valley that makes up the Reserve.

Easy
600 m return
15 mins

The Pebbles

Kunjarra, The Pebbles are a natural rock formation surrounded by myth and legend; a women's place. Kunjarra is believed by the Warumungu Aboriginal people to be related to the Devils Marbles and are a sacred site where a number of dancing and healing rituals have been traditionally carried out.
Due to the significance of the site, visitors are asked not to climb on the rocks.

Easy
1 km return
1 hr

Tnorala (Gosse Bluff) Conservation Reserve

According to Aboriginal belief, Tnorala was formed in the creation time, when a group of women danced across the sky as the Milky Way. During this dance, a mother put her baby aside, resting in it’s wooden baby-carrier (tarne - pronounced tar-na). The carrier toppled over the edge of the dancing area and crashed to earth where it was transformed into the circular rock walls of Tnorala. The Aboriginal and scientific interpretation of the Bluff are similar in that both have a celestial origin. Scientists believe that around 142.5 million years ago anobject from space, believed to be a comet about 600 metres wide, crashed to earth, blasting a crater some 20 km across. Today’s landsurface is about 2 km lower than the original impact surface and the
bluff is about 5 km in diameter, reduced over time by erosion. The remnant crater was named Gosses Range by the explorer Ernest Giles in 1872 after H. Gosse, a fellow of the Royal Society.

Easy
1.5 km return
45 mins

Mt Cahill

A short walk to Mirral Lookout from the viewing platform atop Mt Cahill, one of only a few vantage points to view the floodplains below.